Creating magic milk is an awesome kitchen science experiment and art project for kids to do! It is simple to set up and provides children with a blank canvas on which to create, color, experiment, and learn.

Call it magic milk, milk fireworks, color changing milk, or tie-dye milk. Whatever you name it, give this super easy process science/art activity a try!

Magic Milk as Process Art

Process art is about the journey of creation with minimal focus on the end product. Process science is similar. It is about creating, mixing, hypothesizing, tweeking, testing, retesting, and learning through it all. There is not necessarily a final product and there is no right or wrong way to do it.

Every time we do magic milk I am impressed with the new variations my kids come up with and the new ways they choose to carry out their ideas. This time they added glitter, mixed colors, and developed interesting shapes and patterns.

Getting Magic Milk Ready

*This post contains affiliate links. Please see our disclosure policy.

We headed to the kitchen to gather the following supplies:

  • Milk (we used whole since that is what we had in the fridge)
  • A bowl or casserole dish
  • Food Coloring or liquid water colors
  • Glitter (optional)
  • Liquid dish soap (make sure it’s NOT antibacterial or it won’t work well)
  • Toothpick

Once we had our supplies ready we sat down at the table and followed these instructions:

  • Pour milk in a dish. You don’t want or need much, just a thin film that covers the bottom of the dish.
  • Squeeze a few drops of food coloring or liquid water colors into the milk. Add glitter, if desired.
  • Dip the end of the toothpick into the dish soap and then into the center of one drop of colored milk. Don’t stir it! Watch the color erupt and scatter like a firework in the sky!

Call it magic milk, milk fireworks, color changing milk, or tie-dye milk. Whatever you name it, give this super easy process science/art activity a try!

The Science Behind Magic Milk

There are actually a few different things that are going with magic milk.

First, dish soap is disrupting the surface tension of the milk. Remember when we did our fun experiment with surface tension to see how many drops of water we could fit on different coins? Remember the cool little dome that water forms at its surface? All liquids, including milk, act this way. Adding soap disrupts those bonds along the surface, making the surface molecules spread out and the colors explode like fireworks!

Call it magic milk, milk fireworks, color changing milke, or tie-dye milk. Whatever you name it, give this super easy process science/art activity a try!

Second, soap is super interesting. One end of a soap molecule LOVES water (hydrophilic) while the other side HATES water and loves oil and fat (hydrophobic). Soap can get dishes and clothes clean because the hydrophobic end picks up the grease, oil, and dirt, while the hydrophilic end dissolves in water and washes all the dirty stuff away with it.

Milk, especially whole milk, contains fat and proteins. When soap is added to milk, the hydrophobic end of a soap molecule grabs onto a fat molecule in the milk. With millions of molecules finding a partner all at once, the mixture gets all stirred up! You will notice in my video that it looks like the milk is erupting for several seconds after dish soap is added. This is why. It truly is magic milk!

Call it magic milk, milk fireworks, color changing milk, or tie-dye milk. Whatever you name it, give this super easy process science/art activity a try!

You can easily turn this activity into an interesting science fair experiment by trying it out in different liquids. What happens when you try skim milk versus whole milk? How about something like cream that has lots more fat in it? What about water or vegetable oil? Record your findings and enjoy the process!

More Hands-On Fun for Kids –>

This super easy salt water experiment is the perfect science activity to teach kids about the density of salt and fresh water. Great for an ocean unit!
What kid doesn't LOVE searching for magic hidden treasure? Add frothy, foamy, colorful bubbles and this science activity for kids is irresistible!
Try these simple, fun, and frugal kitchen science experiments with your kids! Each experiment requires common materials that you probably already have.
A year’s worth of captivating STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math) activities that will wow the boredom right out of kids!

Receive a FREE Science Packet by Entering Your Email Address Below



STEM Saturday