A Lesson in Density and the Middle Ages

Our experiment today involves three suspected witches. We are going to scientifically determine how many of these suspected witches are actual, real life witches through the phenomenon of the floating egg.

This experiment was inspired by 100 Science Experiments, a book we love and reference all the time!
Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one! According to the logic of the Middle Ages, a witch would float on top of a body of water while an innocent person would sink like a stone. We are using this same logic in our experiment today.

We obtained three fresh eggs and drew witches on each of them with a permanent marker. Then we filled up three cups of water (about 10 ounces each) and submerged each egg. We added a couple of drops of food coloring to each cup to keep them straight.

Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!

The results?

Well, I forgot to mention that we added salt to two of the cups. Minor detail, right?

Cup #1 (yellow) contained no salt and the egg sank like a stone = Innocent person!

Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!

Cup # 2 (black) contained 2 Tbsp of salt and the egg still sank = Innocent person!

Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!

Cup #3 (blue) contained 4 Tbsp of salt and the egg *DRUM ROLL, PLEASE* floated = WITCH!

Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!

Even when we tried to make Egg #3 sink, it kept bouncing back up to the top to float. So why did this happen?

The Science of the Floating Egg

At first my son thought it must be something to do with the egg. He hypothesized that the eggs that sunk were heavier than the egg that floated. We tested his hypothesis by trading Egg #2 and Egg #3. He was a little baffled by the fact that the egg in Cup #2 still sank and the egg in Cup #3 still floated. Hm, looks like it wasn’t because of the egg afterall.

Then we talked about the difference in the water and voila! The light came on! It was because of the SALT!

When salt is added to water it makes the water more dense. You can think of it like the water gets heavier when the salt dissolves in it. If you add enough salt you can actually make the water more dense than an egg, which makes the egg float.

Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!

Does this mean that ocean water is more dense than fresh water? Yes, yes it does. This is why it is easier for a person to float in the ocean than in a fresh water lake!

Learn more about density with common kitchen materials by creating Color Bombs or your very own Lava Lamp!

What do we do with witches? We cook ’em! Enjoy 🙂

Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!
Create a floating egg in this fun Halloween twist on a classic science experiment for kids! Learn about the Middle Ages, water density, and science in one!

 

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By | 2016-11-18T11:44:15+00:00 October 11th, 2014|Five Minute Science, Halloween, Science, STEM Saturday|12 Comments

12 Comments

  1. Nichole {youclevermonkey} October 13, 2014 at 10:27 am - Reply

    I love how you’ve tied history to science! With a crowded curriculum, lessons that overlap are so valuable. Thanks for sharing your post on my FB page 🙂

    • Crystal October 13, 2014 at 2:31 pm - Reply

      Thank you! I’m always trying to come up with a new twist on the same old experiments 🙂 I love what you have going on, too! So many fun idea 🙂

  2. [email protected] October 15, 2014 at 5:25 am - Reply

    What a great idea for the Halloween season. Thank you for sharing!

  3. Carolin October 16, 2014 at 4:02 pm - Reply

    This is a fantastic idea and I love that you’ve combined science, history and religion in one activity.

    Thanks for linking up to our #MondayParentingPinItParty x

  4. JDaniel4's Mom October 17, 2014 at 6:14 pm - Reply

    Thank you so sharing this post on The Sunday Showcase!

  5. Jill R. October 20, 2014 at 1:44 am - Reply

    This is a very clever experiment! My kids will love this!
    Thank you for stopping by the Thoughtful Spot Weekly Blog Hop this week. We hope to see you drop by our neck of the woods next week!

  6. Crystal October 20, 2014 at 2:40 pm - Reply

    Glad you enjoyed this activity:) It’s one of the easiest out there! Thanks for stopping by.

  7. Joanna Clute October 20, 2014 at 5:01 pm - Reply

    This is such a neat idea:) Thanks for sharing this on Mommy Needs a Timeout Thursday Linkup!

    • Crystal October 21, 2014 at 2:44 pm - Reply

      I hope your kids do love it! Thanks for stopping by 🙂

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